Royal Wedding?

Wait…there’s a royal wedding going on? Huh? I guess I live in a bubble because I had no idea until about 15 minutes ago. I heard the sermon was good! Amen to that! Why is it not in Westminster Abbey?

Also, where am I in the line of succession? I think at least top 50! Haha!

23 thoughts on “Royal Wedding?

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  1. It was likely not in Westminster Abbey because Harry is not immediately in line to the throne. Yes, he’s the son of the Prince of Wales, but remember that after his grandmother, Elizabeth II, there are five people in the line of succession ahead of him: Prince Charles (his father and the current Prince of Wales), Prince William (his brother, who will likely be created Prince of Wales upon Charles’ succession to the throne due to Elizabeth’s death or abdication), Prince George (Prince William’s oldest son), Princess Charlotte (Prince William’s daughter), and Prince Louis (Prince William’s youngest son, who was born late last month). In all likelihood, though, only three of them (Charles, William, and George) will ever actually become the King.

    Since Harry is not immediately in line to become King, his wedding doesn’t necessarily require the pomp and circumstance that comes with marrying in Westminster Abbey, but the church near Windsor Castle (one of the many official residences of the British royal family) is still impressive enough for a Prince of the United Kingdom to wed his bride, don’t you think?

    Technically, Meghan is not considered a Princess, because you usually have to be born into the royal family to get the title. Meghan could be considered a princess consort, consort referring to the spouse of a prince, princess, king, or queen in their own right, but more than likely she will be styled according to Harry’s highest subsidiary title, which as of today is Duke of Sussex, which makes Meghan the Duchess of Sussex. (Upon marrying Harry, Meghan no longer has a surname, but when one is required, like for a driver’s license or official documents, she may use the surname “Mountbatten-Windsor”, which is carried by all of Elizabeth’s male-line descendants.) This is the same reason why Elizabeth II’s husband is styled as Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh and not King Phillip: he is not a king in his own right and did not inherit the title. Phillip is considered Elizabeth II’s king consort.

    A few words worth noting in connection to all this: a “monarch regnant” refers to the reigning monarch (in this case, Elizabeth II is Queen regnant), a “monarch consort” is the spouse of a reigning monarch (Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh is the king consort to Elizabeth II; upon Charles ascending to the throne, his wife Camilla will become queen consort to Charles and continue to be known as Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall), and “monarch dowager” refers to the widow or widower of a deceased monarch (Elizabeth II’s mother, Elizabeth the Queen Mother, was also considered the queen dowager of her late husband, George VI). Hope that clears up some stuff (and teaches you some others).

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      1. I’m a nerd when it comes to this stuff! There’s also some videos on YouTube that may help you understand the history of the British monarchy (which has passed through several somewhat-related families over the thousand years or so that the current form of the monarchy has been in existence), and how one becomes the ruler of the United Kingdom (because England is a country within the United Kingdom, Great Britain is the island England sits on, and the United Kingdom is the nation as a whole).

        Brief History of the Royal Family: https://youtu.be/jNgP6d9HraI
        How to Become the British Monarch: https://youtu.be/BUY6HGqYweQ

        (Update: the British Parliament has since passed a law ending male primogeniture, and from now on the oldest child, period, of a British monarch now gets first rights to the crown, no matter if the child is a boy or a girl.)

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      2. I do like this stuff. Admittedly, I actually do know a lot about the English reformation! God bless Pope Clement VII! Too bad Catherine’s cousin almost killed him and killed most of his army 😥

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      3. I dropped out before finishing college (or even picking a major). If I ever go back, I’ll probably end up majoring in history (in my perfect world, I’d also like to get a master’s in library science; I think working in a library would be well suited to my personality and interests). I don’t have much of an interest to go into teaching at my age (early thirties), I’m too introverted.

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      1. The British royal family, with a handful of exceptions, has not recognized Catholicism within its branches since Henry VIII left the Church in protest in the 1500s after the Pope at the time would not grant him a divorce from his first wife, Catherine of Aragón (who had borne him no male heirs), so he could marry his mistress, Anne Boleyn (who ended up bearing the future Queen Elizabeth I, but was beheaded on trumped-up charges simply because she didn’t bear him a male heir). He got so pissed off at the Pope, that he simply gave a 🖕to the Catholic Church and decided to go form his own church, the Church of England, which pretty much has all the rituals of the Catholic Church, but conducts services in English and allows its members to divorce. (It is today commonly referred to as the Anglican Church, and its American counterpart is the Episcopalian Church.)

        The British monarch is considered the head of the Anglican Church, and the rules go so far as to call any Catholics in the royal family “naturally dead” and ineligible to stand in the line of succession to the throne. (Only six women have ruled as queens in their own right: Queens Mary I, Elizabeth I, Mary II, Anne, Victoria, and Elizabeth II. Only Victoria and Elizabeth II have actually had heirs surviving into adulthood.)

        So, yeah…having the Pope at an Anglican wedding would be incredibly offensive to the crown, as far they’re concerned.

        Here’s a song summing up Henry VIII’s six wives, which ties into the whole Anglican thing: https://youtu.be/3EGzHsye71c

        Liked by 2 people

      2. That may be a nod to Meghan being raised Catholic, if I remember correctly. She still had to convert to Anglicanism, though, in order to receive the Queen’s blessing to marry Harry. Her baptism into the Church of England took place a couple of months ago, and thus they received the Queen’s consent.

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  2. I am a Brit, but I’m still confused as to why the wife of the king is given the title of Queen (Queen Elezabeth, the Queen Mother, and many others, if not all, in history), but the husbands of Queens are never designated King. Queen Victoria’s husband was Prince Albert, and the present Queen’s husband is Prince Phillip.
    It might be unofficially that the women are called Queen instead of Queen Consort, but the men are always called Prince and never King Consort.
    Also, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall was so unpopular with the British public that when she married she agreed not to become Queen but remain Duchess of Cornwall.
    The Prince of Wales’s first wife was not a princess in her own right, but was, and still is, referred to as Princess Diana. That might just be the public and not official, but I’ve never heard her referred to by any other title by anyone.
    It’s all very confusing. Why isn’t William’s wife called Princess Katherine?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve just remembered ghat when Charles married Diana there was a proclamation saying she would be known as Princess Charles. No one ever called her that, though. Although the Duchess of Kent is known as Princess Michael.

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